USCIS to Suspend Biometrics Requirement for Certain I-539 Applicants Beginning May 17, 2021

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December 2020

USCIS extends flexibility for responding to agency requests.

DHS prepares to collect more biometrics from immigrants.

DIVORCE PRIOR TO OATH CEREMONY CAN RESULT IN DENIAL OF 319 CITIZENSHIP APPLICATION

USCIS recently clarified that lawful permanent residents applying to naturalize on the basis of marriage to a US Citizen must not only demonstrate “living in marital union” with their spouse three years immediately prior to filing, but also that termination of the marriage at any time prior to the Oath of Allegiance renders an applicant ineligible.

USCIS updates discretionary criteria for interview determinations of adjustment of status for refugees or asylees.

USCIS officially announces reinstated DACA.

Federal judge nixes new rules restricting H-1B visas.

New DOL and DHS Rules Set Aside by Federal Court

COVID-19 RELATED NEWS

Adjustment of Status During COVID-19

Change of Status Filings During COVID-19

Travel to the United States

With the Presidential Proclamation 9993, foreign nationals present in 26 countries that compromise the Schengen Area have suspended entry. Foreign nationals cannot travel to the United States with Presidential Proclamation 9993 is in effect, unless you meet an exception. The travel restriction doesn’t apply to U.S. citizens, U.S. lawful permanent residents, some immediate family members of U.S. citizens, and other individuals identified explicitly in the proclamation.

Applying for a U.S. visa during the COVID-19 pandemic

On June 22, 2020, the Department of State announced that they won’t be issuing immigrant visas, with certain exceptions, until December 31, 2020. This proclamation suspends entry into the United States of certain immigrants who present a risk to the U.S. labor market during the economic recovery following the COVID-19 outbreak. U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents, and those with a valid visa issued before April 23, 2020, won’t be affected.

Exceptions to the recent immigration ban

Exceptions include immigrants seeking to enter as healthcare professionals, spouses, children, prospective adoptive children of U.S. citizens, and certain Special Immigrant Visa applicants

Having an immigrant visa is not the same as being a Legal Permanent Resident

Having a U.S. visa is not the same as being an LPR. To obtain a green card and become a permanent resident, you need to apply for an adjustment of status once you are in the United States. You can’t apply for a Permanent Resident Card outside the U.S.

Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) outside the United States lose a green card

Thankfully, the recent immigration ban doesn’t apply to lawful permanent residents. However, green card holders who remain outside the United States for more than 12 months may lose their lawful permanent resident status. If you’re worried about losing your green card, you should contact us to learn more about the application process to extend your stay.

WORK VISA QUESTIONS

How to Get a U.S. Work Visa

Steps to apply for a H-1B Visa

LEARN HOW GHOSHAL LAW PLLC - IMMIGRATION LAW FIRM, AUSTIN, TX CAN HELP WITH YOUR LEGAL NEEDS

LEARN HOW GHOSHAL LAW PLLC - IMMIGRATION LAW FIRM, AUSTIN, TX CAN HELP WITH YOUR LEGAL NEEDS

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